Tailor Made Style

It's not about what you wear, but how you wear it.
kleidsam:

I need this because of reasons.

I…really like this jacket.

kleidsam:

I need this because of reasons.

I…really like this jacket.

(Source: likedlooks)

gentstribune:

There is this craze that recently has hit the menswear industry, slim fit. There is no issue with a article of clothing that is fitted, but the term slim is being used too liberally. It’s being used to describe some sort of second skin shirts that limit one’s mobility and potentially show off those pecs that you’ve been working on all summer. Which doesn’t sound like a bad thing at first until you untuck your shirt by lifting your arm, or bending down. Or when you sit down the very low rise on your pants creep onto your junk that makes you uncomfortable for the sake of “fashion”. 
Your not always going to be hitting the club scene with an express shirt and true religion jeans. So you might as well start getting some clothes that “fit”.
Some general rules to follow when buying clothes:
1. Keep sizing down until you get into something that your not comfortable wearing, then go a size up. 
2. Don’t buy something that you don’t feel comfortable wearing. Move around in it, sit down, jump, jog. 
3. After your intense physical activity, take a picture of it and get a critique of its fit from an online form such as styleforum or askandy. (Disclaimer: you will be torn apart by their critique, but at least you’ll get good advice on the fit.) 
-Gtribune

Good advice.

gentstribune:

There is this craze that recently has hit the menswear industry, slim fit. There is no issue with a article of clothing that is fitted, but the term slim is being used too liberally. It’s being used to describe some sort of second skin shirts that limit one’s mobility and potentially show off those pecs that you’ve been working on all summer. Which doesn’t sound like a bad thing at first until you untuck your shirt by lifting your arm, or bending down. Or when you sit down the very low rise on your pants creep onto your junk that makes you uncomfortable for the sake of “fashion”. 

Your not always going to be hitting the club scene with an express shirt and true religion jeans. So you might as well start getting some clothes that “fit”.

Some general rules to follow when buying clothes:

1. Keep sizing down until you get into something that your not comfortable wearing, then go a size up. 

2. Don’t buy something that you don’t feel comfortable wearing. Move around in it, sit down, jump, jog. 

3. After your intense physical activity, take a picture of it and get a critique of its fit from an online form such as styleforum or askandy. (Disclaimer: you will be torn apart by their critique, but at least you’ll get good advice on the fit.) 

-Gtribune

Good advice.

(via mugenstyle)

J. Crew’s Ludlow pants

My brother is ordering the Ludlow pants from J Crew for a wedding and had questions, so I thought I’d turn to you. My brother is concerned with the fit, as he can’t try them on before buying.

Does anyone know how the pants fit, particularly in regards to the waist? The site says below the waist, but by how much? My brother is relatively slim, but has developed a gut more recently that could get in the way.

If you know anything about the Ludlow pants, send me a message!

Thanks, everyone!

patrickjohnsontailors:

The DOUBLE REVERSE FOUR-IN-HAND using a P JOHNSON Black Grenadine.

1. Put the tie around the neck, underside facing up and then the first move is to pass the large blade under the small blade (hence ‘REVERSE’), that way when it’s wrapped around the small blade it is brought back to it’s front side facing out.

2. Wrap the large blade around twice (hence ‘DOUBLE’). You can use your fingers to hold the two loops that you’ve created open if you find it easier.

3. Then pass the large blade, tip first through the two loops you’ve created. It might require a bit of adjustment as you pull it through. It also work best when you achieve one or two small folds or furrows feeding into the knot.

4. Tighten the knot. When doing so you’ll need to tease the outer loop down a bit as you go, otherwise it will pull awkwardly. It needs to be tightened pretty firmly to reduce its size and to recover enough length. Bingo.

It’ll create varied looks and some subtle asymmetry and allows the knot to have good three-dimensionality and flourish on the neck. It exposes some of the smaller blade and looks natural and shows off the quality of the tie. 

It takes some practice and works best if you start with a generous amount of the large blade. Everyone will tie it differently and that is a great thing, it’s a malleable knot in this sense. Not for everyone perhaps but it tends to work with plenty of collars and face shapes and works beautifully on knitted ties, soaking up some excess length.

Ties are designed to (hopefully) be beautiful things and need knots that best show their inherent qualities. It’s just a piece of silk (or other cloth) folded with some inlay and is fundamentality their to divide and decorate the chest and complete and harmonise/set-off an outfit. So if the knot is too mute or dull the outfit will collapse with it. Different knots say different things and need ultimately to be an extension of the wearers character, like all clothing. 

Also known as the Kelvin knot, which as a scientist I tend to like.

(via exquisitetrimmings)

acuratedman:

Just copped.

Linen & Denim Extreme Cutaway’s by Trashness.