Tailor Made Style

It's not about what you wear, but how you wear it.
putthison:

The Elevator Pitch of How to Start Dressing Better
A few weeks ago while out with friends and acquaintances I was asked a familiar question when the fact came up that I blog about men’s style: “How can I start dressing better?” 
This isn’t an easy question for me to quickly answer and is beyond the attention span of most people in the course of a free-flowing conversation — especially over beer at a bar. While I’m happy to talk about the subject at length, I do try to avoid chatting someone’s ears off about my various obsessions. 
Entire books are written about the subject and an overwhelming amount of resources are available on the Internet. Even Jesse’s 25-pieces of basic sartorial knowledge is tough to rattle off when you may only have enough time to tell someone a few sentences. 
What I needed was the “elevator pitch” of how a guy can begin to dress better — an idea that he can act on and sets the ball rolling. 
Now I suggest one simple thing: “Wear nice shoes.”
Ugly shoes can ruin an otherwise acceptable outfit and nice shoes can elevate an ordinary one. While it’s no shortcut to having better style, it does begin the process to get a man thinking about the subject. 
Learning about nice shoes implants the idea of aesthetics and higher-quality purchases in a guy’s head. At the very least, guys who take this advice will stop wearing ratty gym trainers and rubber-soled “sporty” hybrid dress shoes. 
I think that once a guy starts down this path, he will eventually broaden his view toward the rest of his wardrobe. If he’s wearing nice shoes, then perhaps he begins to think about getting a few nice shirts. Or a sport coat and proper fit.
And maybe one day he’ll become too self aware about his pocket square collection to know that he doesn’t have any seasonally-appropriate ones for his tweed jackets and spends an hour looking for the right one that blends burgundy and tan.
Or maybe not. It may just be enough that he’s wearing better shoes, which I think is a good thing. So, that’s my new pitch: “Wear nice shoes.” 
-Kiyoshi

The only other short (and obvious to many) piece of “elevator pitch” advice I give is about proper fit.I’ll be adding this now.

putthison:

The Elevator Pitch of How to Start Dressing Better

A few weeks ago while out with friends and acquaintances I was asked a familiar question when the fact came up that I blog about men’s style: “How can I start dressing better?” 

This isn’t an easy question for me to quickly answer and is beyond the attention span of most people in the course of a free-flowing conversation — especially over beer at a bar. While I’m happy to talk about the subject at length, I do try to avoid chatting someone’s ears off about my various obsessions. 

Entire books are written about the subject and an overwhelming amount of resources are available on the Internet. Even Jesse’s 25-pieces of basic sartorial knowledge is tough to rattle off when you may only have enough time to tell someone a few sentences. 

What I needed was the “elevator pitch” of how a guy can begin to dress better — an idea that he can act on and sets the ball rolling. 

Now I suggest one simple thing: “Wear nice shoes.”

Ugly shoes can ruin an otherwise acceptable outfit and nice shoes can elevate an ordinary one. While it’s no shortcut to having better style, it does begin the process to get a man thinking about the subject. 

Learning about nice shoes implants the idea of aesthetics and higher-quality purchases in a guy’s head. At the very least, guys who take this advice will stop wearing ratty gym trainers and rubber-soled “sporty” hybrid dress shoes. 

I think that once a guy starts down this path, he will eventually broaden his view toward the rest of his wardrobe. If he’s wearing nice shoes, then perhaps he begins to think about getting a few nice shirts. Or a sport coat and proper fit.

And maybe one day he’ll become too self aware about his pocket square collection to know that he doesn’t have any seasonally-appropriate ones for his tweed jackets and spends an hour looking for the right one that blends burgundy and tan.

Or maybe not. It may just be enough that he’s wearing better shoes, which I think is a good thing. So, that’s my new pitch: “Wear nice shoes.” 

-Kiyoshi

The only other short (and obvious to many) piece of “elevator pitch” advice I give is about proper fit.

I’ll be adding this now.

abitofcolor:

Take Care of Those Shoes- Kirby Allison of the Hanger Project is now the leading retailer of Saphir shoe polish and shoe care in the country. Here is a link to his website and blog where he is encouraging guys everywhere to join him for Shoe Shine Sundays. There is even live chat. His website has instructional videos and information on shoe care, including suede and exotic skins. Abitofcolor recommends that you check it out if you want to keep your shoes looking their very best. http://www.hangerproject.com/closet/blog/shoe-shine-sundays/

Definitely something I’ll be checking out!

abitofcolor:

Take Care of Those Shoes- Kirby Allison of the Hanger Project is now the leading retailer of Saphir shoe polish and shoe care in the country. Here is a link to his website and blog where he is encouraging guys everywhere to join him for Shoe Shine Sundays. There is even live chat. His website has instructional videos and information on shoe care, including suede and exotic skins. Abitofcolor recommends that you check it out if you want to keep your shoes looking their very best. http://www.hangerproject.com/closet/blog/shoe-shine-sundays/

Definitely something I’ll be checking out!

putthison:

Black Tie at the 2013 Oscars

It’s easy to lament about the state of black tie in Hollywood during award shows, but some men are worth highlighting for wearing a tuxedo well and with an adherence to tradition. 

Hugh Jackman’s tuxedo from Tom Ford was my favorite, featuring a very unique double-breasted shawl-collared jacket and he was one of the few to wear a simple pocket square. The ensemble is quite masculine and reminds me of something you’d perhaps see an actor wear while browsing through old Hollywood black and white photos. And we all know he was actually able to move quite well in it.

And Bradley Cooper’s three-piece tuxedo worked equally well, I thought (also by Tom Ford) — especially when comparing how the waistcoat fit him properly in comparison to Ben Affleck’s three-piece. The broadness of the peaked lapels looked much more striking in comparison to the many other tuxedos of the night that were notched. 

What I liked about Chris Pine’s simple double-breasted 6x2 tuxedo from Ermenegildo Zegna was that it has a simplicity and symmetry to it that feels uninterrupted and quite plain. Where other men were wearing Vegas-club styled black dress shirts or “creative” jackets, this tuxedo up against any of those wins hands down in terms of elegance. 

Finally, it’s worth mentioning Christoph Waltz’s midnight-blue shawl-collared tuxedo from Prada. I thought it moved with him quite well when he accepted his Oscar on stage and fit him better, especially when compared to the midnight-blue tuxedo worn by Daniel Day Lewis, whose tuxedo didn’t quite fit in the shoulders and had divoting. Waltz’s jacket could be improved by removing the flap pockets and allowing for more shirt cuff to show, but I liked it quite a bit. 

These four have forgone wearing black shirts, neckties, notched lapels, two-button fronts, flap pockets (excepting Waltz) and have sought to cover their waist with either a waistcoat, cummerbund or by going double-breasted. And because of this, I think they’re better-dressed for it. 

-Kiyoshi

humblegentleman:

thesilentist:

Sneakers and Suits: No, thank you

Last week, Evolving Style mused about wearing sneakers with a casual suit, saying, “Done well, it just looks good.” (Yes, he said much more than that and wrote a follow-up, too. Go read both, as they’re the reason why I’m writing this post.) 

One may argue the look is “trendy”, “fashionable” or even “stylish” in the most broad sense of the term, but it doesn’t present a look of being well-dressed in a “classic” sense. And that’s my objection to the look.

I’m not entirely sure why people enjoy the sneakers and suit look. Perhaps these synthetic, rubber-soled, radioactive-neon tumors show their keen sense of rebelliousness and creativity — so eager to break rules! — where the contradiction is the appeal.

But I don’t share those values and it’s my preference to wear clothing where each item shares a similar level of formality and function. 

The visual effect of looking at a tailored suit and then ending at the sneaker is a jarring one. This comes from the inherent contradictory realms the pieces occupy. To be dressed well, all elements must work in concert, not in chaos. 

The simple fact is that sneakers are for athletics and sportswear — they’re a different class of clothing in terms of use and formality than what even the most casual of suits can occupy. The two should remain separate for their respective functions and never intersect. 

It should be understood that while sneakers are for casual wear, a casual suit is simply just a less-formal type of suit. This doesn’t diminish the suit’s importance and reason for being worn to that of a situation where casual athletic sportswear is appropriate. 

A casual suit requires a more casual shoe, however, not the most casual shoe. Bucks, saddle shoes, spectators, suede brogues and even the controversial loafer are appropriate for the casual suit. I feel this achieves a harmonious look and is best. 

I find the look a bit childish, like what a teenager or disaffected college student would do in a situation where they’re forced to wear a suit but hate the idea of dressing up. 

I like wearing the appropriate clothing for the situation. I see no personal need for fashionable rebellion. 

I have had the same reservations about the look of wearing sneakers with a causal suit. Although I thought it would be one of those trends where after a while you begin to appreciate what the look represents or is trying to convey, the style still seems to bother me. For me, the sneaker and suit combination tries to integrate two articles of clothing that are so far apart in style that they never homogenize and therefore become contradictory. This, to me, diminishes the whole outfit.

I am not saying that individuals who wear the suit and sneakers combination are not “stylish” (or whatever you want to say). Some of the people I respect most pair these two together at times. Patrick Johnson is one example. He looks extremely comfortable and more at ease when he wears a causal suit that anyone else I can think of. If there was one person who I thought could make this look an aesthetically pleasing one, it would be him. However, I do not think it can be done. 

Kiyoshi makes a great point that no real situation calls for wearing sneakers with a suit. To me combination is not functional and, as Kiyoshi points out, the sole purpose seems to be rebellion.

A “causal” suit does not necessarily invite the casualness of sneakers. No matter how you wear your suit, it is still inherently formal in a way that sneakers can never be.

theodinspire:

thenocoast:

Chicago #menswear meetup (a photo from our last meetup). 

Just a reminder

Glad this popped up.

theodinspire:

thenocoast:

Chicago #menswear meetup (a photo from our last meetup). 

Just a reminder

Glad this popped up.

I have the purple saddles, my good friend has the wingtips in navy.
We love them, though his are more versatile.

I have the purple saddles, my good friend has the wingtips in navy.

We love them, though his are more versatile.

(Source: mugenstyle, via mrmoderngentleman)